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View Full Version : Why the change of publisher in the UK?



Cheek Stag Otter
December 15th, 2003, 12:49 PM
Hello all this is my first post here!

I was just wondering why from "Triss" onwards Brian's books have been published by Puffin instead of Red Fox/Random House. It doesn't really make a difference really because luckily they've pretty much kept the same font/layout etc but I just thought it was strange since Brian has been with Random house so long.

Thandruil
December 15th, 2003, 03:19 PM
Hi Cheek,

I never notived that! Im not sure but I think Random house is a Canadian publishing company and puffin is in Britain (I never really pay attention to the publishers). Maybe he just wants a publishing company around him.:confused: I am probably wrong though:(

Keyla
December 15th, 2003, 03:32 PM
No, I believe it has changed. Prior to "Triss" it was Red Fox in the UK and Random House in the US, whereas now it is Penguin and Puffin, which are the same company, I believe. I would guess that the change of publisher may have something to do with later British release date, although it is hard to say how.
I am not really surprised by the change of publisher. Perhaps they were just offering a better deal.

Martin the Warrior
December 15th, 2003, 08:24 PM
Welcome to the Forum, Cheek!

Just to clear up who's publishing what and where--

The UK/Canadian publishing was initially handled by Random House, through their Hutchinson imprint for hardcovers and their Red Fox imprint for paperbacks/companions.

The US publishing has always been handled by Penguin Putnam, through their Philomel imprint for hardcovers/companions. Paperback releases are generally handled by the Ace Fantasy imprint, although the first four books were released in paperback by Avon/AvoNova (a precursor to Ace, I believe) through arrangement with Putnam (and later rereleased by Ace). A younger reader edition is also released through the Firebird imprint.

After the release of The Taggerung, Brian switched publishers in the UK, bringing his work to Penguin, which is the same publisher he uses in the US. Their releases are via their Puffin imprint. Why Brian made the switch has never actually been cleared up, but I'd imagine it makes things easier to only have to deal with one publisher, especially for a silmultaneous release (I'm still not clear on why Loamhedge was delayed in the UK, but the publisher change has been cited as a reason).

Hope this helped you out.

Cheek Stag Otter
December 16th, 2003, 12:11 PM
Thanks for the help guys, I guess that clears everything up really.

Senav
December 16th, 2003, 04:29 PM
Sad. I liked the old Red Fox versions better. The Triss paperback is gonna look really out of place alongside all the old ones.
Eh, whatver works...

Lord Sarkin
December 21st, 2003, 09:39 PM
sometimes the illustrator changes with the publisher too.I think the illustrater for the us copy of loamhedge was a lot better.

Martin the Warrior
December 22nd, 2003, 09:04 PM
The illustrator changes have nothing to do with the publisher situation.

The original illustrator, Gary Chalk, left due to creative differences.

The second illustrator, Allan Curless, passed away following The Long Patrol.

The third illustrator, Fangorn, only intended to fill in for a brief time until Curless' proper replacement could be found, which is why he left after three books.

The fourth illustrator, Peter Standley, was thought to be the new permanent illustrator, but he was only around for one book (Taggerung).

The fifth and current illustrator, David Elliot, came in for Triss and continues with Loamhedge. He, presumably, is around for the foreseeable future.

Keyla
December 28th, 2003, 12:14 PM
Much as I like Peter and David I miss Fangorn's style, and not just because he was named after a walking talking tree. Okay, Ent and I suppose it wasn't his real name. I really liked the way his animals seemed so much like a drawing of a real otter, mouse or whatever creature yet still looked right.
That said I really like Elliot's use of colour and landscape; it is very dynamic and effective in my opinion. With both the "Triss" and "Loamhedge" covers he has used interesting perspectives and shapes to draw the onlooker in the cover, while still conveying what the book is about. His use of computers and traditional tecniques is very clever and, to my eyes at least, seemless.

Cheek Stag Otter
December 29th, 2003, 12:21 PM
Originally posted by Martin the Warrior
The illustrator changes have nothing to do with the publisher situation.

The original illustrator, Gary Chalk, left due to creative differences.


Sounds interesting I wonder what they were.

Martin the Warrior
December 29th, 2003, 04:14 PM
Originally posted by Keyla
That said I really like Elliot's use of colour and landscape; it is very dynamic and effective in my opinion. With both the "Triss" and "Loamhedge" covers he has used interesting perspectives and shapes to draw the onlooker in the cover, while still conveying what the book is about. His use of computers and traditional tecniques is very clever and, to my eyes at least, seemless.

Just to let you know, David Wyatt does the UK covers. Elliot is interior illustrations only.