PDA

View Full Version : Official Metroid Prime/Metroid Fusion Discussion Thread



Martin the Warrior
November 20th, 2002, 08:13 PM
These could, quite possibly, be the most anticipated Nintendo games of the year. Given that they were released this week, a thread was inevitable. ;)

I haven't gotten around to Fusion yet, so this particular post will only focus on Prime. I'll get around to that little GBA game later. Those of you with Fusion, though, are free to discuss it here (rather than have two Metroid threads floating around).

In preparation, I dug out the old NES Metroid (the only one I owned-- oddly enough, I never got around to Super Metroid and only rented Metroid II for a few days years ago). Always fun to play (as are most NES games).

With the mood in place, it was time for Metroid Prime. I have never been a fan of First Person Shooters. The concept rarely rose above "bloodbath", the perspective often provided clunky controls, and there were always better ways to spend my money. So, when it was announced that the next Metroid game would be, essentially, a FPS, I wasn't exactly thrilled. Plus there was the fact that a brand new, American company (who traditionally make lackluster games) was behind it. Nevertheless, I stuck by the game, watched it's progress and slowly became intrigued. The interface, as described at E3, sounded like a rather innovate way to approach things. I had to admit, the trailers were pretty cool, too. So, that helped make up my mind as to whether or not to get the game. The question became, "would I like it?"

Well, in a word: yes. (First level and first level only spoilers ahead.)

I've barely scratched the surface of MP, having completed only the first level. However, the atmosphere of the game is incredible. It opens up with Samus landing her ship on a Space Pirate frigate/platform orbiting the planet Tallon IV. It starts out as a quick way to acclimate yourself to the controls, then you find your way inside. And here is where the atmosphere of the game begins to come into play. It doesn't take long before you realize that something has gone horribly wrong inside the frigate. In the first main room you encounter, there are fires going, a huge insectoid carcass in the center of the room, and multiple dead Space Pirates. You'll encounter a few live ones as you go, but more often than not they're already dead. A scan describes, in detail, how they died.

Something got loose.

As you venture in further, the death toll continues to rise and you'll find multiple creatures in stasis tanks, the product of Space Pirate genetic manipulation tests. Finally, you'll make it to the center of the frigate. Upon entering the chamber, you'll find three more dead Space Pirates-- the bodies are still warm, though. In the middle of the room a huge creature appears and begins spewing green goop at you and the first boss fight of the game begins. Upon completion, the frigate's self-destruct mode is initiated and you're in a race against time to make it out of the station alive. Everything is active now-- more Space Pirates, swarms of bugs flood the tunnels (and collide with you, smearing a green sludge across your helmet), even a few of the stasis bugs break loose. When all is said and done, a cybernetic creature that looks suspiciously like Ridley swoops down. The next thing you know, all of you upgrades-- Morph Ball, Varia Suit, Charge Shot, Grappling Laser, Bombs, etc.-- are gone and Samus is reduced to her "shoulder-less" suit. Ridley vanishes and you make it back to your ship. The mission will continue on the planet.

The plot is negligible, told mainly through logs you stumble across (if you choose to read them) more than cutscenes. It's rare to encounter cutscenes, actually.

The controls will take some getting used to, but as with all games, a little practice makes all the difference in the world.

Retro has really gone and impressed me-- incredible considering this is their first game-- and seems primed (pun unintended) to take the place at Nintendo's side once held by Rare.

Martin the Warrior
November 21st, 2002, 04:42 PM
I've played Fusion through three of the "sectors" and am halfway through the fourth, which I think is far enough to accurately gauge the game.

Calling it the sequel to Super Metroid probably isn't much of a stretch, as it plays exactly how I imagine SM does (I'm crossing my fingers I'll be able to find a used copy or that Nintendo will do a GBA port). It's smoother version of the NES game, with better graphics, more moves, and tighter gameplay. The GBA never ceases to amaze me and I can't wait until the GC/GBA adaptor is released next year so I can play this on a TV. (As always, the GBA's screen remains its biggest drawback.)

This game is more plot-centric than the other Metroids, which can be both a good and bad thing. On the one hand, you're told where you need to go, so you're never at a loss over what you need to do and won't wander around aimlessly. On the other hand, you won't wander around aimlessly and, thereby, explore. ;) To me, this isn't that big of a drawback, though, as the lack of direction is what has kept me from completing the NES Metroid. I should mention, though, that even with the "mission" setup of the game, you'll probably work your way through every room, regardless.

Most missions center around either getting to a Data Room to receive a suit-upgrade or getting to a Boss to defeat it. Sometimes after getting to your objective, the route you took will suddenly be bombed and become impassable, so you're forced to find an alternate exit path. Then, there's SA-X.

Given that Fusion is so plot heavy (although not as heavy as, say, Zone of the Enders: The Fist of Mars), I should explain some of it.

Following Samus' elimination of the Metroids on their homeworld of SR388 (in Metroid II: The Return of Samus), a team of scientists from Biologic Space Labs were hired by the Galactic Federation to observe the restructuring of SR388's eco-system (now without Metroids). Samus was to accompany them as a field agent. Once on planet, she was attacked by a previously unknown parasitic lifeform known as "X". X infected Samus and quickly spread into her power suit. In order to save her life, the scientists had to surgically remove portions of the infected suit. Even that did not save her life, however. Then, the cure was found: a vaccine created from the cells of the Metroids, which were the natural predators of X and whose extinction caused the parasite's numbers to grow rapidly. Being infused with the cells of Metroids, now, Samus is healed by raw X parasites instead of harmed by them. So, having been outfitted with a new Fusion suit, Samus is dispatched to the Biologic Space Labs after sensors pick up an unknown explosion in the quarantine bay. The game has begun.

The X parasite is your main recuperative item-- yellow for health, green for missiles, red for both (as near as I can tell). The parasite is able to infect numerous creatures-- the monsters of the game-- and will only show themselves after you defeat the monster. There is one being, however, who is far more dangerous than the others-- SA-X. SA-X is composed of Samus' old armor, fully upgraded, a veritable walking killing machine. It patrols the labs, seeking Samus, destroying sections of it, and letting monsters loose. With Samus now being infused with Metroid cells, she's vulnerable to the Ice Beam-- which, naturally, SA-X is armed with. Whenever you encounter SA-X there is only one thing you can do: run. It provides a rather suspenseful sense of being hunted throughout the game as you've no idea whether or not SA-X will suddenly appear. A confrontation is inevitable, you can only hope you'll have all your upgrades when that happens, though.

All in all, a very fun game which I've spent more time on than Prime (although I'd place them equally on the "good game" scale... GBA has just been more convenient).

Since I didn't get to it in my last post, I'll mention the link-up. These two games are, I think, the first instance of Nintendo making use of the GBA/GC link-cable (Sonic 2 used it, as well, but that's a Sega game). Thus far, I'm aware of only two benefits. First, you're able to upload the Fusion suit onto Prime, thereby being able to play in it. Second, if you complete Fusion and link-up, you'll unlock the original, NES Metroid, which you'll then be able to play on your GC. There are doubtless other goodies to be had by linking up, though, so if I encounter them, I'll let you know.

Red Draco
November 22nd, 2002, 07:51 PM
Yep, been spaced out on Prime myself. ^_^ And I finished Fusion. Er, I mean, I finished the ROM. Heh heh.

Like Martin, I'm not a big fan of FPS. But then, Prime isn't really a FPS. There's tons of exploration involved. And the atmosphere is quite incredible. Especially the Tallon Overworld. I like the Brinstar music remix. The attention to detail in the game is amazing.

I had a great time with Fusion, and will buy it when money allows. The good thing about the two games is that, between them, they offer you many options. Fusion is very chatty, story-oriented and somewhat linear. Prime is a little more traditional in that respect, with a silent Samus and a general background story.

Fusion is easily one of the most engrossing games I've played in years. I sat up all night to finish it. It's been time out of mind since I did that with any game. It felt good. :) The game is linear, but it's done in a way that doesn't make you feel confined. Some people complained about the Adam thing being out of character for Samus, but I thought it was interesting.

I have one major problem with Prime: It gives me motion sickness. I'm looking for ways around it, if anyone has suggestions.

Both games are A+. Hooray, everyone's a winner!

Baby Rollo
November 22nd, 2002, 09:18 PM
I love First Pereson Shooters. I adapt to the controls very quickly. Aliens Vs. Predator is my favorite one right now. I just beat the Marine Missions today. The last level is the coolest.

I don't think the GC controller is good for FPS because of the akward position of the analog sticks.

Martin the Warrior
November 23rd, 2002, 09:03 PM
Both games continue to be great, and I've barely scratched the surface of Prime. With Fusion, I just received the Super Bombs and am hiding from SA-X's roving eye. In Prime, I took care of the "Increased War Wasp Activity" flame-thrower mini-boss, then doubled back to use the bombs to get a few more missile upgrades (the upgrade boxed in by the gates was fun, actually).

I haven't encountered motion sickness, myself, Draco. But, then, I advance carefully, scanning anything I can from a distance and sniping waiting enemies. What parts, specifically, give you trouble?

Rollo-- the GC's right analog stick doesn't differ in placement from a PS2 controller, and I think its placement of the left stick is actually more convenient. So, I wouldn't call it awkward. ;)

Baby Rollo
November 24th, 2002, 02:15 PM
I get motion sickness from playing Medal of Honor: Frontline. But I never get motion sickness from any other game.


Rollo-- the GC's right analog stick doesn't differ in placement from a PS2 controller, and I think its placement of the left stick is actually more convenient. So, I wouldn't call it awkward.

Well, it would be akward if you don't own a gamecube.

Red Draco
November 25th, 2002, 09:16 PM
No one specific part gives me sickness ... just playing for a prolonged period of time can do it to me. Heck, sometimes I'm done after twenty minutes. Sometimes I can last two hours. It's whacky. :)

Martin the Warrior
November 25th, 2002, 10:28 PM
Whacky indeed. The only time I've become disoriented so far is fighting the first mini-boss in the Chozo Ruins-- the machine that spit out the red war wasps that circled you. I foolishly tried to circle with them, which led to falling into the water, which led to my first and only death in Prime thus far.

I haven't been able to sit and play Prime much farther than my last report. Hopefully I'll have time over Thanksgiving. Fusion, on the other hand, I've been able to snag a few scattered moments here and there and am now in the fight of my life with SA-X. It's downright unfair how his Screw Attack trumps mine. ;) His blasts I can avoid.... but when he jumps right into me, it's adios Samus.

Fusion had a fun selection of bosses, I have to say.

The Red Badger
November 26th, 2002, 09:18 PM
Prime has far exceeded my expectations. I feel comfortable saying that this is the best game of the year and one of THE reasons to own a GameCube. Watch as Retro becomes the new golden boy of Nintendo.

If only they can get a follow-up out. . . series never seem to get two entries per generation (unless they're Final Fantasy). In the old days, we'd get THREE or more per generation. Three Marios on the NES. . . six Mega Mans. . . a couple of Castlevania's. . . Nowadays, you'll get one main game and one or two half-games or sub-games (Majora's Mask and Paper Mario are prime examples).

GIVE ME MORE!

Martin the Warrior
November 27th, 2002, 11:32 AM
Well, last night I was able to finish Metroid Fusion. SA-X took me roughly four or five tries, all told. (Following Spoiler deals with Boss Forms and SA-X Strategies.)

Once the Samus form was taken care of, it was a rather easy fight. The Screw Attack kept me from harm while the giant creature was hopping around, and when it became the spiky X upgrade, it was a simple matter of staying airborne in Screw-Attack-Mode. Passing through it sent of plenty of curative X's, making it a simple matter to ultimately defeat it.

It was a rather fun boss fight, if short once you figure out how to best avoid SA-X's Screw Attack. The final boss was also rather interesting, if something of a cakewalk. Overall, Fusion deserves to be in every GBA library. If you don't have the game yet, add it to your gift list.

As a side-note, I hooked up the two games and unlocked the original Metroid. As near as I can tell, the old passwords still work and the game is in its original form (right down to its inability to have more than three shots from Samus on the screen at once). The play control is what takes some getting used to. The A button fires, the B button jumps, the Z button serves as the "Select" button (meaning it's what switches you over to missiles), and the analog stick moves you. The L button quits the game and goes back to Prime. For someone used to playing Metroid on the NES, it takes some getting used to. It might have been better if they'd allowed you to use the GBA as a controller for the game, as it, at least, has the same general set-up of an NES controller.

Anyway, it's time to dig deeper into Prime.

Red Draco
November 28th, 2002, 05:49 PM
How do you get the black spoiler bar to work? This forum doesn't allow HTML, sooo...old ways are the best for now.

|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
V

I'm just wondering what you all thought of the Adam Malkovich thing in Fusion. I've heard a lot of complaints about it, because Samus is supposed to be a loner. The idea of a love interest hasn't been sitting well with some, although others (myself included) found it interesting. What surprises me is that Prime is much more akin to Super Metroid than Fusion, at least in spirit. It's non-chatty, unless you want to scan the story as you go along, and Samus doesn't talk. Also, the game is much less linear than Fusion.

The sheer attention to detail in Prime amazes me. I took down some flying pirates in the Magmoor Caverns, and when it blew up (after a futile attempt to kamikaze into me :D), the resulting lightshow illuminated Samus' visor, and I could *see her eyes* in the reflection. Not only that, but the eyes point in the direction you're looking in. Wowsers.

Slagar the Cruel
November 28th, 2002, 06:38 PM
[ spoiler ]This is how you use the spoiler tag.[ /spoiler ]

Anyways, I haven't gotten either titles yet, but I hope to have them a little less than a month from now... I've been playing Super Metroid to tide myself over...


If only they can get a follow-up out. . . series never seem to get two entries per generation (unless they're Final Fantasy). In the old days, we'd get THREE or more per generation. Three Marios on the NES. . . six Mega Mans. . . a couple of Castlevania's. . . Nowadays, you'll get one main game and one or two half-games or sub-games (Majora's Mask and Paper Mario are prime examples).I know what you mean... :( Wah.

Martin the Warrior
November 28th, 2002, 08:50 PM
How do you get the black spoiler bar to work?

Either use the [ spoiler ] tags like Slagar said, or click the "Spoiler" button in the vB Code area on the post/reply page. Provided scripting is enabled, it will bring up a new box you can type in which will auto-format the spoiler-text when you're done.



I'm just wondering what you all thought of the Adam Malkovich thing in Fusion. I've heard a lot of complaints about it, because Samus is supposed to be a loner. The idea of a love interest hasn't been sitting well with some, although others (myself included) found it interesting.

Either I didn't notice something or just didn't read too deeply into things, because I never took Adam to be a love interest. More of a close personal friend and mentor. So, to be honest, it didn't bother me in the slightest. Then again, I never quite viewed Samus as a "loner" after the old Valiant Nintendo comic collections where she frequently appeared in Captain N the Game Master and had a one-shot of her own. In the context of those comics and the background they provided (which I believe is corroborated with the NES game's instruction manual), it's very logical for her to have developed some friendships during her years with the Galactic Federation. I found it to be a nice angle to explore in Fusion, even if the computer Adam changed colors a little too quickly for my taste.


The sheer attention to detail in Prime amazes me. I took down some flying pirates in the Magmoor Caverns, and when it blew up (after a futile attempt to kamikaze into me ), the resulting lightshow illuminated Samus' visor, and I could *see her eyes* in the reflection. Not only that, but the eyes point in the direction you're looking in. Wowsers.

I agree, that effect is amazing to see. It will also show up if you find a dark area, charge a shot, and fire it at a wall you're right up against. I have to admit, I still find it incredibly cool the way the environment plays off of the visor-- bug goop, raindrops, steam. I'm anxious to hit the point where I'll have more visors to switch between.

Red Draco
November 29th, 2002, 03:58 PM
And here I was, messing with tables and cells only to discover that HTML doesn't work. The simplest answer is always the best one. :)

I remember those Valiant comics. My husband actually has most of them. You're right about Samus in those stories. She's very talkative, agressive, and has a number of friends (including that other bounty hunter, 'Big Time,' whose name I love for some reason.)

Then Nintendo Power published a Super Metroid comic that started out promising, and then went to heck because the writer / artists was told to wrap it all up in six issues instead of the planned twelve. The comic touched a little on Samus' background story ... her parents were killed in a Pirate invasion, and she was the only survivour of the attack. The Chozo found and raised her. And apparently, Nintendo's adopted the comic's story, or vice versa. Or so it's apparent if you look at Samus' trophy in Super Smash Bros. Melee.

But ...

The Valiant comics came out when there was only a sprite of questionable gender parading across the screen. So of course, the comic writers took liberties. I doubt Nintendo had a background story for Samus at the time. Now they do, and it's covered quite a bit in Prime. Not in dialogue, mind you. Mostly through Chozo lore. Gathering what I've read, Samus was, as a child, sad and lonely. Besides which -- and this is my own speculation, again gathering from what I've read -- I don't think the Chozo could communicate very well with Samus, if at all. Not exactly a healthy social environment. It doesn't surprise me why people think of her as a loner, and find it strange that she found Malkovich.

I don't think Samus and Adam were anywhere close to fire and passion and all that good stuff, but I think they cared for each other as very good friends, and a little more. Something that would've developed if left to its own devices. It's just the impression I got during the "don't do this, Adam" sequence near the end of the game. There was something between them. At any rate, I liked Fusion's ending. ;) Haven't seen Prime's yet.