PDA

View Full Version : Classical Music



Lonna Bowstripe
May 12th, 2005, 08:47 PM
How many of you like classical music? What are your favorite composers? Your favorite compositions? Etc.


As most of you already know, my favorite composer is Rachmaninov. His rich, lush, big, music is always beautiful, but he can throw in the fiery Beethoven, too. His 2nd piano concerto is big at first, then resolves into that legato melody. Rhapsody on a Theme by Paganini is probably my favorite classical compositon ever, especially the 18th variation. I also enjoy his choral The Angel, where when the choir moves on to the next theme, the piano echoes the previous theme.

Rachmaninov is followed a close second by Debussy. His music, like Rachmaninov's, is lush, but not big. Debussy will also throw in the occasinal syncopation, such as in Golliwogg's Cakewalk from Children's Corner. My favorite piece by him will have to be Images I: Reflects Dans L'Eau.

And Beethoven, you can't forget him! :p Beethoven is a great composer. While not as rich as Rachmaninov and Debussy, that can be expected because he lived over half a century earlier. Beethoven is firey, probably because had a bad childhood and became deaf. It always amazes me how he could compose while he was deaf! It's a miracle! I do believe he could feel the vibrations, though. His ninth symphony is, well, probably the greatest piece ever written, partly because of its feeling and, well, it's very musical! and partly because Beethoven was deaf when he wrote it. As I like to say: "Beethoven 'patented the clash.'"

I also enjoy Classical and Barouqe: Mozart, Bach, Handel, etc, but not as much. I guess I prefer the rich melodies of the Romantic over polyphony of the Barouqe. The Reninassance can be nice too; all the parts independant.

Hisk
May 12th, 2005, 08:52 PM
I'm not big on WAM, but I'll occasionally catch myself listening either to Holst or Katchaturian (whose name I can't spell). IE...like three time per year.

Cale Yin
May 12th, 2005, 09:10 PM
Is this the 3rd music topic? anyway, I would like to have recommendations. What should I listen to while I'm doing homework (there are 2 kinds of homework for me: art homework, and the dreaded left-brained papers and readings and other ugly things)? Things that will encourage my concentration and not demand my attention? Did I already ask this?

PiarasJ
May 12th, 2005, 09:11 PM
I dont know anything about classical music, but lately I've been listening to ABC Classic FM on the radio, as a protest against all the Hiphop they keep playing on Triple J. :P

I've decided I like classical guitar, and I think this one dude does some fantastic things with didgeridoos, I don't know why it wasn't done sooner. Or maybe it was and I just wasn't listening.

Mum likes Chopin, so we have a couple of CD's that I listen to sometimes when I'm studying or drawing and I can't decide whether it would help my concentration more to listen to music, or have silence. The lack of lyrics is good for concentration, plus I think it's good to have GOOD music playing in the background when you're being creative because then it flows into your work.

edit: funnily enough, I'm drawing right now (or I was, but I'm having a break to eat some chocolate slice that my sister made), and I'm listening to Bob Dylan. I don't think you could possibly consider his music technically GOOD, but it's still brilliant. There's nothing like listening to the words "EVERYBODY MUST GET STONED" when you're trying to be serious.

Josiah the Warrior
May 12th, 2005, 09:15 PM
I like it, but I'm not really into it. I just listen to the big name composers, my favorites are Bach, Ludwig Van and Mozart. Oh man in chorus we did this Mozart piece (Coronation Mass aka 'Kyrie', pronounced 'Key-ree-eh') it was incredible! We have an awesome teacher and we used a professional orchestra, we preformed it in a church of course and it was just incredible. I bought the CD and although I'm not one for self-praise, no one could've done it better than we did, at first I thought they gave us the wrong CD it was so good. Even my loser friends who only listen to their stupid ska and 'PR' had to admit it was brilliant.:slagar. A night I'll never forget.

Hisk
May 12th, 2005, 09:17 PM
I would like to have recommendations. What should I listen to while I'm doing homework
Not what I mentioned! LOL! You've probebly heard Katchie's "saber dance" on a commercial TV show or whatnot, it's pretty familiar. NOT something you try and listen to and concentrate at the same time!

PiarasJ
May 12th, 2005, 09:17 PM
That is so weird. Caleyin posted her question while I was typing, and my post answered her question.

Spooky.

Lord Servone
May 12th, 2005, 09:50 PM
I like classical music, though its mainly in the form of movie scores (John Williams, Hans Zimmer, Howard Shore, and more).

Some classical songs I like are Farandole (Bizet), O Fortuna (Orff), Piano Concerto in A Minor (Grieg), The Planets: Mars, The Planets: Jupiter (Holst), Piano Conrcert #1 (Tchaiskovsky) Adiago for Strings (Barber), Funeral March (Chopin), and March to the Scaffold (Berlioz). Those are some recommendations I....recommend.

I find classical music as good background sound, as when I'm writing or reading. I like the lack of lyrics (or lyrics that are in another language)...as somebody else said, its easier to concentrate with it. I wrote some pretty good scenes when listening to the right sounding song.

Cale Yin
May 12th, 2005, 10:03 PM
My parents went to Arizona (Southwestern state characterized by desert and red rocks and art community) a while ago and they saw a guy performing on the road, and he was doing Spanish guitar, and they bought his CD. It's pretty good. What is 'didgeridoo'? and how do you say it?

Josiah the Warrior
May 12th, 2005, 10:08 PM
What is 'didgeridoo'? and how do you say it?
A digeridoo is an instrument native to native Australians (help me out with detail Piares! :slagar ). It's pronounced "dih-jer-ree-doo", mate.

PiarasJ
May 12th, 2005, 10:40 PM
heh, yep Josiah's spot on. It's thousands of years old, made from a thick eucalyptus limb that has been hollowed out by termites. You blow in one end and the vibrations make a really distinctive sort of music, there are some pretty clever didj players around, such as Xavier Rudd (http://www.xavierrudd.com/)

To play it properly you have to learn to blow air out of your cheeks while simultaneously replacing it with air from your lungs so that the sound is constant rather than stop-start-stop as you take breaths. It's pretty tricky (for me at least, I couldn't do it when I tried).

Xavier's music is great for creative work and concentrating. It's really mellow.

Ferahgo the Assassin
May 13th, 2005, 08:31 AM
I love classical music. As unoriginal as I may be, I think that Beethoven is probably my favorite composer. In my opinion, his best piece (and my favorite, naturally) is his Symphony No. 6 (Pastoral) Op. 68: I Allegro Ma Non Troppo. I first heard it as a rather small child in the original Fantasia movie, and was blown away. It's a beautiful piece, if not one of Beethoven's more popular ones.
...and I'm listening to Bob Dylan. I don't think you could possibly consider his music technically GOOD, but it's still brilliant.
I consider Bob Dylan good! He's definitely one of the best lyricists of all time, and he can really tear up that harmonica. ;) Not the best voice in the world, of course... but everyone has their faults.

Lord Servone
May 13th, 2005, 12:11 PM
I saw Dylan in concert a couple of years ago and it was great. He is probably one of the best songwriters alive, though not necessarily the best singer...

Treerose
May 13th, 2005, 12:13 PM
A classical music topic not started by me! ;)

Nothing unoriginal about liking Beethoven, Feragho…there’s a very good reason why he’s so popular, and that’s because his music is so great. ;) He’s one of my favorites, too.

I love giving classical music recommendations, so Caleyin, I’m going to go ahead and give you and any others who might be interested a big list. ;) (Operative word being big. <g>)

Before I get to that, I just wanted to point out that if you don’t know anything about classical music, or want to learn more about other classical styles besides Beethoven and Mozart, the other arts, especially the visual arts, are a huge help. Especially in this last century, what happened in painting had its parallel in music. When we had Impressionist painters, we had Ravel and Debussy in music, when we had Expressionist painters, we had Schoenberg, who was also an Expressionist painter himself. Cubism – we have Schoenberg again, and even Igor Stravinsky was influenced by Picasso. Surrealism…Edgar Varese and Bohuslav Martinu. And so on. Not only in painting, but in writing and architecture, too…the arts are all so related to one another. So basically, if you like a certain style in one art, you can find its parallel in the other arts.

Igor Stravinsky:

The Firebird Suite: Whole thing is spectacular, but the best parts are the “Ronde des princesses,” “Infernal Dance of King Kashchei”, and the final movement, “Berceuse.”

Petrouchka About a puppet named Petrouchka in love with another puppet, who’s a ballerina. Originally a ballet, so the connection between the plot and the music is obviously very important. Poor Petrouchka… that’s all I’ll say. ;)

Rite of Spring: Everyone probably knows this from the latest Disney “Fantasia”, but if you want to hear a piece that caused a riot at its premiere, try this. This is not like Firebird or Petrouchka… this is amazing, weird, terrifying (literally! the entrance of the Sage is some of the most chilling music you’ll ever hear), loud, dissonant, and not something to play for background music for dinner. This music seizes you by the throat and makes you listen. ;)

Gustav Holst:

The Planets: “Jupiter” and “Mars”, but especially “Jupiter.” This has a marvellous, grandiose melody (later used in the hymn “I Vow To Thee My Country”).

Giuseppe Verdi:

Requiem: Definitely the showiest movement is the “Dies Irae / Tuba Mirum.” (Josiah, if you liked the Mozart Mass, you might like this, too. ;)) The “Tuba Mirum” section has the most spectacular multiple-trumpet-scoring in music history, including one which is off stage and answers the onstage trumpets.

Leonard Bernstein:

Candide Overture: A great piece, with a beautiful middle section. Best recording of this is the one of Bernstein himself with the New York Philharmonic. If you like this, also try his West Side Story, too.

Aaron Copland:

A Lincoln Portrait: Includes a narration of quotes of and about Lincoln. That means there is only one recording of this to get: James Earl Jones (with the Seattle Symphony). No one can beat him! ;) This piece (with JEJ!) is a supreme example of how perfectly text and music can go together.

Billy the Kid: A great, thoroughly American West piece, complete with a gunfight courtesy of the percussion section. ;)

George Gershwin:

Rhapsody in Blue This is very famous, of course, but it’s great to hear this with Gershwin himself at the piano. If you like Gershwin, you might want to try An American in Paris, too.

Nicolai Rimsky-Korsakov:

Scheherazade: Based on the tale of Scheherazade. The solo violin cadenzas represent her voice, and each movement tells a different story (like Sinbad the Sailor). Brilliant and beautiful by turns, this is one of my favorite pieces.

Russian Easter Overture: Very beautiful, gorgeous orchestration.

Sergei Prokofiev:

There’s lots of famous Prokofiev…. For the Love of Three Oranges, Lieutenant Kije, Romeo and Juliet, and Peter & the Wolf.

Peter is a narrated story about a boy vs a wolf, but it’s not just for little kids. Kije is a suite from a film score of Proke’s.

Erik Satie:

Gymnopedies. There’s a few of these, originally scored for piano, but Number 1 is the most famous. Satie was a jokester composer (“Before composing a work, I go round it several times accompanied by myself”), but despite his scoffing at serious music, this is just pure, simple, peaceful, beautiful music.

Gabriel Faure: Pavane: A short yet truly beautiful gem of orchestral music.

Requiem: Another Faure gem… it’s shorter and much happier than requiems usually are. The “Agnus Dei” is so sunny and peaceful….

Ralph Vaughan Williams:

Fantasia on a Theme of Thomas Tallis, The Wasp Overture, Five Variants of ‘Dives & Lazarus’, The Lark Ascending for violin and orchestra, English Folk Songs Suite…. Basically, anything of his is great! <g>

Peter I. Tchaikovsky:

Symphony #4: Russian Romantic composer. The most famous of Tchaik’s symphonies, this is seriously anguished music at times, and more upbeat at others.

Symphony #1 – “Winter Daydreams” This is actually a cheery Tchaik symphony! ;) Very pretty, gorgeous slow movement, and overall sounds just like a scene from a snowy countryside, complete with one-horse sleigh and sleighbells.

1812 Overture - I just have to mention this in case you like hearing artillery in music. As Calvin (of Calvin & Hobbes) once said, “They play this in crowded concert halls? Gee, I thought classical music was boring!” (Actually, the only times I’ve heard this were in outdoor performances… I suppose bringing in cannons do limit the choice of performance venues somewhat. ;))

Hector Berlioz:

Symphony Fantastique: Written probably while Berlioz was on drugs, and it sounds like it. ;) (A wild and weird man, anyway.) The “March to the Scaffold” movement is the most famous, and let’s just say that the music is, um, very descriptive, at the end… ;)

Ludwig van Beethoven:

Symphonies 3, 5, 6, 7, 9: in particular are really great, but all Beethoven symphonies are good. ;). Along with the 5th, the “Pastoral” or 6th symphony are probably his most popular, but my favorite’s probably the 7th. ;)

Maurice Ravel:

Daphnis & Chloe: There’s sheer magic in this, in the way it’s orchestrated, and in the melodies used…. :) There were pirates in the original ballet. Pirates! Who doesn’t like pirates? ;) (Okay, we don’t have to answer that. <g>)

Antonin Dvorak:

Symphony #8 (or G Major): Czech composer Dvorak was very prolific in terms of wonderfully singable melodies, and this is just crammed with them.

Jean Sibelius:

Finlandia: Written when Finland was under Russian oppression, this piece became the anthem for the Finns in their fight for freedom. The slow melody from this has been turned into a hymn, too: “Be Still My Soul.”

Symphony #5 - Sibelius’ symphonies are really underrated. I love the final movement of this piece… it reminds me of the music used in the movie Spirited Away, for some reason…

Bela Bartok:

Romanian Dances - Bartok was very interested in the folksongs of his native land, as this suite shows… if you want to try other Bartok, his Concerto for Orchestra is good, too. This is a very different style from Beethoven and the Romantic era, though, so consider yourself warned. ;)

Paul Hindemith:

Symphonic Metamorphoses is a cool, 20th century piece. There’s dissonance, as there is in much of 20th century music, but dissonance in a good way. ;)

Morton Gould:

American Salute: A great, short piece by an American composer based on “When Johnny Comes Marching Home.”

Dmitri Shostakovich:

Putting Shosti on this list is questionable… this is not light music... The 13th symphony, Babi Yar is tragic, heavy, yet beautiful music, though, based on the horrors that took place at Babi Yar during World War II. Hearing the composer himself read the poems “Babi Yar” and “The Loss” and the NY Philharmonic playing the symphony is really a unique musical experience.

Renaissance/Medieval music:

An often unexplored era…. very pure music, uncomplicated music which is often refreshing to listen to today. Best composers of the Renaissance are Guillaume Dufay, John Dunstable, Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina, Josquin des Prez, John Dowland, Guillaume Machaut, and Roland de Lassus.

Medieval music… Hildegarde von Bingen is not only one of the earliest composers for which we have a name, but she was a woman, too. ;) Leonin and Perotin also wrote some of the earliest forays outside of the usual Gregorian chant.

I’ve tried to cover as many styles as I can, because classical music is so broad, there’s something for everyone to like. (I didn’t even get to the anti-consonant music, but maybe some here would like that, though… ;))

Tree

~~~~~

“Mr. Prokofiev might well have loaded up a shotgun with several thousand notes and discharged them against the side of blank wall."

~A disgruntled critic’s review of Prokofiev’s “For the Love of Three Oranges”~

Lonna Bowstripe
May 13th, 2005, 04:45 PM
Leonard Bernstein:Bernstein... You have to admire his Chichester Psalms. The flowing music matches the flowing words.
Gabriel Faure:
Requiem: Another Faure gem… it’s shorter and much happier than requiems usually are. The “Agnus Dei” is so sunny and peaceful….
Personally, I prefer the 6th movement. (Can't remember the name.) Lord of the Rings reminds me of it. I think Howard Shore copied… ;)
Best composers of the Renaissance are Guillaume Dufay, John Dunstable, Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina, Josquin des Prez, John Dowland, Guillaume Machaut, and Roland de Lassus.You forgot Tomás Luis de Victoria. His O Vos Omnes really is a beautiful piece of music.

And you forgot Kabalefsky on that list… ;)

Treerose
May 13th, 2005, 05:11 PM
Well, this wasn’t a comprehensive list, Lonna. ;) And thank goodness – that means there’s a lot more out there to discover and enjoy! <g>

I haven’t listened to de Victoria as much as the other Renaissance composers, so that's why I didn't list him, but you're right, he's a good one, too. My favorite work of his is “O Magnum Mysterium”… just gorgeous.

And Kabalevsky… wow, haven’t heard that name in a long time. Anyone here play his music on the piano? That’s where I first heard of him, when I was a little kid banging out stuff on the piano as fast as I could. ;) (I hated playing slowly…thankfully, that’s changed. <g>) I really haven’t heard any of his music since then, as my focus is on orchestral repertoire, and he didn't write anything really prominent for orchestra – what music of his do you like?

Sixth movement of the Faure… that would be the Libera Mei… I’m not sure I can think of any resemblance between that and any of the LotR soundtracks…which part did you have in mind?

Tree

~~~~~

“I am not one of the great composers. All the great have produced enormously. There is everything in their work - the best and the worst, but there is always quantity. But I have written relatively little.”

~Maurice Ravel~

Lonna Bowstripe
May 13th, 2005, 05:15 PM
Tree–Listen to "The Bridge of Khazad Dûm." I think you'll get the idea. ;)

Cale Yin
May 13th, 2005, 08:07 PM
Piaras- Oh, I know what that is. Those are fun. ^.^

Tree-

Before I get to that, I just wanted to point out that if you don’t know anything about classical music, or want to learn more about other classical styles besides Beethoven and Mozart, the other arts, especially the visual arts, are a huge help. Especially in this last century, what happened in painting had its parallel in music. When we had Impressionist painters, we had Ravel and Debussy in music, when we had Expressionist painters, we had Schoenberg, who was also an Expressionist painter himself. Cubism – we have Schoenberg again, and even Igor Stravinsky was influenced by Picasso. Surrealism…Edgar Varese and Bohuslav Martinu. And so on. Not only in painting, but in writing and architecture, too…the arts are all so related to one another. So basically, if you like a certain style in one art, you can find its parallel in the other arts.

Fortunately, I just finished the entire history of art, 2 semesters of it, with emphasis on quantity over quality (of examination of the art). From the cave paintings in... uh, somewhere that starts with an L, to... about 10 years after cubism and surrealism and something else that comes after that. ...Obviously, I spent a lot of time studying this subject. :eek: I remember what things looked like, though.
Thanks for the list, Tree! :D

PiarasJ
May 13th, 2005, 08:21 PM
Treerose- That's interesting about the link between music and visual arts, I'd never really considered that. When you describe impressionism (as an example) you would probably explain how the aim of the impressionists was to capture the effect of light on the subject, and that they used nervous brushstrokes and dappled colour. How would you describe the equivalent movement in classical music? Do you have some examples of compositions that echo specific movements in visual art? I'd love to listen to some of them, because things like that really interest me.

Just a random question - do you have any examples of music which echo Chagall's paintings?

Cale Yin
May 13th, 2005, 08:48 PM
My art history book also says something about impressionism being the artist's attempt to capture a glance of a scene, the first impression, or that was what some critic said, and that's how it became 'impressionism'. What one sees in a glance.

PiarasJ
May 13th, 2005, 10:43 PM
Oh right, I hadn't heard that. That's a good description. I read in one book that impressionism was a derogatory term that one critic used to describe Monet's paintings, and he and his followers took it on as the name of their movement. It might be the same thing that you read, only your quote didn't use the word derogatory.

What are violin strings made of? Steel?

Treerose
May 14th, 2005, 12:01 AM
Tree–Listen to "The Bridge of Khazad Dûm." I think you'll get the idea. ;)

Soon as I can stop listening to Revenge of the Sith, I will. ;)


Fortunately, I just finished the entire history of art, 2 semesters of it, with emphasis on quantity over quality (of examination of the art). From the cave paintings in... uh, somewhere that starts with an L, to... about 10 years after cubism and surrealism and something else that comes after that. ...Obviously, I spent a lot of time studying this subject. I remember what things looked like, though.

Thanks for the list, Tree!

Any time! ;) The art history sounds like it was fun, Cale Yin. I'm not that good when it comes to knowing styles and painters and art history... I've always thought it would be fun/useful to learn more, especially in the 20th century when there are so many different styles to keep straight. :o (But I still maintain that half of them look like they were painted by monkeys! ;))


Treerose- That's interesting about the link between music and visual arts, I'd never really considered that. When you describe impressionism (as an example) you would probably explain how the aim of the impressionists was to capture the effect of light on the subject, and that they used nervous brushstrokes and dappled colour. How would you describe the equivalent movement in classical music? Do you have some examples of compositions that echo specific movements in visual art? I'd love to listen to some of them, because things like that really interest me.

For Impressionism in music, there are two composers who are specifically known to be "Impressionist", although they fought tooth and nail to avoid being pegged as such. ;) Claude Debussy (who, incidentally, I left off my list, shame on me! :o) and Maurice Ravel, but especially Debussy.

His Afternoon of the Faun is a great example of Impressionist music. It uses shimmery orchestral effects, pastel tone colors (you won't find Verdi-esque trumpet calls in here!), new harmonies (it uses modes and chromaticism, instead of being strictly set in one or two keys)... Like Cale Yin said about the Impressionist style being a first impression of something, Debussy's music is a lot more vague than the clear-cut classicism of, say, Mozart, which is always specific in terms of the form of the piece and what's happening musically. Debussy said he wasn't trying to directly portray the afternoon the Faun has, but more hint at the memories and dreams of such a day... he was all about shading and blurring of harmonies and nuances. A piece like the Faun simply did not exist in Mozart's time... no one ever dreamed of writing like this.

He isn't simply an Impressionist composer, though... he was highly influenced by the Javanese gamelan ensemble he heard at the World's Fair in 1889, so he had sounds like these in his ear, and he was also influenced at the poet Mallarme's famous Tuesday evening gatherings, where he met Symbolist poets and writers and painters...all those who were at the forefront of French art and literature of the time. But overall, his music just sounds the way Impressionist paintings look, so that's why he's automatically linked to the Impressionist style.

Same thing with Expressionism, which, if I'm recalling my art styles (Cale Yin, correct me if I'm wrong <g>), features really jagged, harsh lines and basically paint thrown at the canvas, although those who defend the style will probably say it's painted very carefully in terms of where each stroke goes. ;) Schoenberg, who was an Expressionist painter himself, composed music in the same way... it sounds like it's just thrown onto the page, is very harsh and linear and is mathematically calculated rather than melodically driven. No Monet "Waterlilies" here. ;)


Just a random question - do you have any examples of music which echo Chagall's paintings?

I do, actually! Sergei Prokofiev's music. ;) I was re-studying his flute sonata earlier this year, and my teacher recommended that I look at Marc Chagall's work, because Prokofiev's style of music really goes well with Chagall's style of painting. They were both born around the same time, and both were once considered too modern in their fields, although Chagall's use of color and the way he gives things perspective remind me the most of Prokofiev's music. (Very different from the subtle nuances of Debussy's music or Impressionist paintings.)

As for other specific examples…

Well, if you *really* want to listen to Schoenberg (I don’t recommend it <g>), Pierrot Lunaire is a good example of Expressionist music…. Schoenberg’s music is closely related to Kandinsky.

Also, I’ve heard that John Cage’s music is related to Rauschenberg’s pop art works in terms of using every day objects... Cage invented the “prepared piano”, which is basically sticking a lot of things like bolts and bits of leather and such in the piano strings where they don’t belong and where they make weird noises. ;) If you want to experience a John Cage “composition”, sit at a piano for 4 minutes and 33 seconds without playing a note, and that’s it. <g>

Edgar Varese was influenced by the architect Le Corbusier, famous for his International Style buildings… Varese even wrote a piece called “Poeme Electronique” in collaboration with a building Corbusier designed for the Brussels Exposition as a kind of multimedia affair, so architecture goes well with music, too.

Any styles you’re specifically interested in, Piaras? The arts are so intertwined, it’s fascinating to find connections between them.

Speaking of music and painting, I COMPLETELY forgot to mention a fantastic work by Modest Mussorgsky... his Pictures at an Exhibition. This work is made up of many short movements, and each one musically describes a different painting from an exhibition a friend gave. Between each movement is a short "Promenade" which describes the walk from one painting to the next. The music really resembles the subjects given in the titles, and it finishes with one of the grandest, most awe-inspiring endings in all of music, with the movement entitled "The Great Gate of Kiev." I played this a few years ago... the brass completely went to town with this, and it was some of the loudest (but best) music I'd ever heard. ;)


What are violin strings made of? Steel?

Usually steel, yes. ;) Some have synthetic or composite cores.... it depends on the kind of sound the violinist wants. I used to use steel E strings, but the other three strings had perlon cores with aluminum wrapping around them... you knew it was time to replace the string when it got worn somewhere and the metal winding began to unravel. ;) Professional violinists probably use higher quality metals like silver, though. Other violinists still use gut strings, called catgut, which isn't actually cat, but sheep intestines...

Tree

~~~~~~

"I always try to make myself as widely understood as possible; and if I don't succeed I consider it my own fault."

~Dimitri Shostakovich~

PiarasJ
May 14th, 2005, 05:00 AM
Wow, thankyou very much for going to all that trouble! :)

Feel free to ignore the rest of this post, it fails pitifully. ;P


Originally posted by Treerose: Debussy said he wasn't trying to directly portray the afternoon the Faun has, but more hint at the memories and dreams of such a day... he was all about shading and blurring of harmonies and nuances.I think it's great that he could use music to portray a scene in that way...because I had never known it was possible before I searched for Debussy on the net and listened to Claire De Lune. ...it was strange when I first thought of it, because music is an aural medium, and doesn't immediately strike me as a way of depicting a scene (or it didn't before now). But the thing is, painting is purely visual, and can only just begin to come close to depicting the scene in it's fullness, just as describing it in written form can't create the full impression in the readers mind, and a dance is only part of the reality... *insert remainder of thought in coherant language here*

I suppose when a musician or an artist or dancer realises they have something they want to pass on to an audience in some way, or even if they just want to record it for their own satisfaction, (Like Beatrix Potter said about drawing being the result seeing something beautiful and feeling an overwhelming desire to record it no matter how poor the result) they can only pass on the poetry, they can't pass on the scene itself. The poetry is the important bit in life, because without it you'd be pretty dead. You'd see a tree, know it's called a tree, but it wouldn't mean anything, it would just be the word "tree" inside your head. That's why I like music and art, and the people who make it.

I think eternity will be where we get to see everything the poetry in this life was hinting at. That will be intense.


Originally posted by Treerose: Well, if you *really* want to listen to Schoenberg (I don’t recommend it <g>) …. Schoenberg’s music is closely related to Kandinsky. Kandinsky? No thanks. >.<

I can't believe you actually know of music that echoes Chagall's paintings. That's...superlative. XP I'm trying to listen to some of Sergei Prokofiev's music now, but it keeps stopping and starting, and since I'm in the mood for making links between the arts, that could be compared to cutting a Chagall canvas into little pieces and looking at them one after the other in the hope that it will still look beautiful. :p


Originally posted by Treerose: Any styles you’re specifically interested in, Piaras? The arts are so intertwined, it’s fascinating to find connections between them.I love impressionism, and I love Chagall's work. What would you class him as? I've heard his work labelled surrealist, symbolist, cubist, and I've heard the man himself called a poet. But none of those words make sense when you look at his paintings...although his work touches on each of those movements, and he's certainly a visual poet. Picasso's work leaves me cold, I don't like cubism. Too much like looking at a perfectly good painting through a broken window, but for some reason Chagall's cubism influenced paintings aren't like that. I think it's because he used cubism as a solution to some of his compositional problems rather than as an end in itself, which seems to be the case with Picasso. I'm certain I'm seeing it in an overly simplistic way, but...there ya go.

The way you described Debussy's Afternoon Of The Faun makes me want to listen to it, but I can't find it on WinMP unfortunately...


Originally posted by Treerose: Speaking of music and painting, I COMPLETELY forgot to mention a fantastic work by Modest Mussorgsky... his Pictures at an Exhibition. This work is made up of many short movements, and each one musically describes a different painting from an exhibition a friend gave. Between each movement is a short "Promenade" which describes the walk from one painting to the next. The music really resembles the subjects given in the titles, and it finishes with one of the grandest, most awe-inspiring endings in all of music, with the movement entitled "The Great Gate of Kiev." I played this a few years ago... the brass completely went to town with this, and it was some of the loudest (but best) music I'd ever heard. That is so cool. I'd love to be part of a circle of mates like that...a bunch of bohemians who get together for a drink while one of us plays a newly composed piece on the piano in the corner, another sets up his easel and does an oil sketch of the knot of scruffy dilettantes talking about poetry beside the coffee table. Everyone is broke, but the rich art dealers with funny names who frequent our meetings generously lend money and organise exhibitions and recitals for us. How very stylish. But style doesn't matter, because the muse is often dressed in rags.

Please excuse me. :p

Cale Yin
May 14th, 2005, 12:47 PM
I had a really long post that I intended to write, but I can't muster up enough brain cells for it right now... I'll post it later tonight or something.

The reason I am saying this instead of not posting is because I had part of the post typed, and it sat there for 3 hours, and I tried to finish it, and it was ugly. :\

Treerose
May 14th, 2005, 02:56 PM
I love impressionism, and I love Chagall's work. What would you class him as? I've heard his work labelled surrealist, symbolist, cubist, and I've heard the man himself called a poet. But none of those words make sense when you look at his paintings...although his work touches on each of those movements, and he's certainly a visual poet. Picasso's work leaves me cold, I don't like cubism. Too much like looking at a perfectly good painting through a broken window, but for some reason Chagall's cubism influenced paintings aren't like that. I think it's because he used cubism as a solution to some of his compositional problems rather than as an end in itself, which seems to be the case with Picasso. I'm certain I'm seeing it in an overly simplistic way, but...there ya go.

I don't really know enough to classify Chagall's work.... Prokofiev, though, is a mix of styles, but above all, he was a musical maverick who wrote in a cosmopolitan (i.e. Western) way. This didn't endear him to the Communist Soviet authorities around World War II, who dictated how their composers could write. Like Stravinsky, he spent a lot of time in the West, which was frowned upon in Moscow, and eventually, he simply wasn't allowed to leave the country. And like Shostakovich, he tried to write as ordered, even winning the Stalin Prize at one point, but his music was so unique that the authorities got too paranoid and along with Shostakovich and others, his works were formally denounced as too "formalist" and banned. (Shostakovich.... it's a raging debate in musical circles as to whether he was for or against Communism, but that's another can of worms. ;))

Proke's music is hard to peg in a certain style because he didn't always write the same way. He was known as an enfant terrible who liked to shock people with his music, especially in his younger years, and when he visited America, he was frustrated to find that people only wanted to hear Beethoven. Some of his music is Neoclassical ("Classical Symphony"), reflecting how Haydn might write if he was living in the 20th century. Others are written more in a satirical/grotesque vein ("Lieutenant Kije"), while his gift of melody is nearly always evident ("Romeo and Juliet", "For the Love of Three Oranges" suite). He changes key a lot, rhythm and melody is very important.. overall, he's just a very distinctive-sounding composer.


The way you described Debussy's Afternoon Of The Faun makes me want to listen to it, but I can't find it on WinMP unfortunately...

I hope you can find a recording somewhere... Faun is the quintessential Impressionist music. Other Impressionist music:

- Debussy, "Petite Suite" (the version for orchestra)...very beautiful, lush melodies
- Debussy, "La Mer"... it really does sound like the ocean! Again, the color and timbre is what sets this apart, as well as the Eastern harmonic influences.
- Debussy, “Nocturnes”… more beautiful Debussyesque writing.
- Ravel, "Daphnis & Chloe"... gorgeous, shimmery beginning, and ends with a whirlwind of a finale
- Ravel, “Ma Mere L’Oye”… this is his Mother Goose Suite, which features beautiful yet simple melodies. Not as Impressionist as Debussy, but still lovely.

There’s also beautiful piano music by Debussy, like Clair de Lune, which you’ve heard, and there’s also The Sunken Cathedral… probably lots more, but I don’t know his piano music very well.

If you want to learn more about Prokofiev, there’s a great site at http://www.prokofiev.org which has lots of information about him. ;)

Hope this helps, and happy listening! :)

Tree

~~~~~~
"My mother had to explain that one couldn't compose a Liszt rhapsody because it was a piece of music that Liszt himself had composed. Also, one could not write music on nine lines without bars, because music was, in fact, written on five lines with bars. All of this prompted Mother to give me a more systematic explanation of the principles of musical notation."

~Sergei Prokofiev, on his first composition at age 5~

Lonna Bowstripe
May 14th, 2005, 09:03 PM
Debussyesque writing. :lol: That does decribe it, though.

Treerose
May 15th, 2005, 01:41 AM
:lol: That does decribe it, though.

Not as fun as describing Arcangelo Corelli's music, though. <g> I just had to laugh every time this book we used in a music class this semester described his music or his style as Corellian. ;)

Tree

~~~~~

"Composing is like driving down a foggy road toward a house. Slowly you see more details of the house-the color of the slates and bricks, the shape of the windows. The notes are the bricks and the mortar of the house."

~Benjamin Britten~

Baby Rollo
May 15th, 2005, 01:55 AM
For a modern day example of music composed in the classical style, I suggest the theme song to Elfen Lied, Lilium

The lyrics are in Latin and Greek and it was written in an early church style where there is no set beats per measure and the music just "flows"

Here are the Lyrics and the Translation:

Os iusti meditabitur sapientiam
Et lingua eius loquetur iudicium
Beatus vir qui suffert tentationem
Quoniam cum probatus fuerit accipiet coronam vitae
Kyrie, Ignis Divine, Eleison
O quam sancta, quam serena, quam benigna
Quam amoena O castitatis lilium

The Just shall meditate wisdom
And his tongue shall speak judgement (Psalm 37:30)
Blessed is he who resists temptation
For at trial he shall receive the crown of life (James 1:12)
Lord, Divine Fire, have mercy
O how holy, how calm, how benevolent
How comforting, O lily of purity

PiarasJ
May 15th, 2005, 05:34 AM
The reason I am saying this instead of not posting is because I had part of the post typed, and it sat there for 3 hours, and I tried to finish it, and it was ugly. :\I know what you mean, that happened to me yesterday. >.<

I'm on the hunt for Debussy. It would be nice to have some classical music that I can enjoy in my discman while I paint, Chopin and The Slawische Rhapsodie are good...but they tend to make me tighten my fingers on the paintbrush unconsciously until I realise I've been dashing paint in short choppy strokes across parts of the painting that should have been flat, subtle washes...it's not cool. :p

Lonna Bowstripe
May 15th, 2005, 11:24 AM
I'm on the hunt for Debussy. It would be nice to have some classical music that I can enjoy in my discman while I paint, Chopin and The Slawische Rhapsodie are good...but they tend to make me tighten my fingers on the paintbrush unconsciously until I realise I've been dashing paint in short choppy strokes across parts of the painting that should have been flat, subtle washes...it's not cool. :p

Clair de Lune–Debussy
Girl with the Flaxen Hair–Debussy
Reverie–Debussy
Rhapsody on a theme by Paganini, 18th varation–Rachmaniov
Prélude in C-sharp minor, Op. 3, no. 2–Rachmaninov
Doctor Gradus ad Parnassum–Debussy

PiarasJ
May 16th, 2005, 04:42 AM
Thanks dude, I'll keep an eye out. I heard Debussy mentioned on Classic FM today, and I thought...YEAH! I recognise a name! :P

Incidentally, where have I heard Clair De Lune before? Or have I just heard it in passing on the radio...?

They're nice lyrics Rollo, by the way.

Cheesethief
May 16th, 2005, 04:11 PM
Incidentally, where have I heard Clair De Lune before? Or have I just heard it in passing on the radio...?
I think there might be a French children's song of a similar name. Just my two pence. :D


They're nice lyrics Rollo, by the way. Personally, I found the combination of Latin and Greek to be a little silly. I prefer Libera Me for a good old Latin singalong. Even if it is about death, pestilence, and the like. :p

PiarasJ
May 16th, 2005, 05:57 PM
I can't read latin or Greek, I was going by the English bit he posted. :p

It's the tune of Clair De Lune that I recognise, I'd never heard of the name before. I thought I might have heard it on a movie...maybe not.

Cheesethief
May 17th, 2005, 03:20 PM
I think this counts as classical. Anyway, I recently purchased the Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time and Majora's Mask soundtracks. I've always loved Zelda's music, and I saw these at a fair price, so I went for it.
Anyway, for those who don't know, Koji Kondo composed the music in the above titles. And in my opinion, it's pretty good.

Personally, I found it took me right back to when I first switched on my N64. The symbol appeared, followed by a couple of logos, and then...boom. Soft music drifted out of my console. The logo appeared, and I was hooked.
The music varies in length: most of the pieces are about a minute, although there are several that last quite a bit more. It's beautifully rendered, with some great beats and melodies that really stick. The instruments vary as well: There's the Sages' bass monastic vocals, and then there's the bongo drums from Goron City. Some of the pieces come in orchestraic versions as well, and are also highly commendable.
At the moment, I've only really listened in depth to the Ocarina of Time soundtrack, but Majora's Mask had some great pieces too, so I'll get back to you on that.

Anyway, I highly recommend this to anyone who's a Zelda fan and is looking for some good music.