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chupacabra
March 11th, 2006, 08:29 PM
there is no mention of God , or Jesus or Virgin MAry so they are not western christans. they are not buddhist or Hindu since they do cause a lot of suffering to vermin. They must be new agers.

Folgrimeo
March 11th, 2006, 10:05 PM
They don't have a religion. Or at least aren't supposed to. However, if I had to choose one, I'd choose whichever religion has abbeys and believes in caring for all creatures good and evil, never resorting to violence unless attacked. Only when attacked will they attempt to defend themselves, and even then they won't try killing the other side unless absolutely necessary.

Hmm...

mon·as·ter·y
1. A community of persons, especially monks, bound by vows to a religious life and often living in partial or complete seclusion.

That sounds right. So, uh, I guess whatever religion is usually associated with monks, if any.

Renegade
March 12th, 2006, 12:44 AM
I think someone (TBT?) mentioned before that BJ himself said that there is no religion in Redwall ...

Qlberts
March 12th, 2006, 05:19 AM
Abbeys are usualy assosciated (did I spell that right?) with the Roman Catholic church. however, BJ himself has indeed stated that there is no religion in Redwall. Redwall is an abbey because it is a place of goodwill and friendship.

LordTBT
March 12th, 2006, 07:22 AM
BJ has stated there is none, however I feel one does exist.

It is a fictional religion though.

Arrowtail
March 12th, 2006, 09:13 AM
Well, to avoid offending all the zealots out there, Brian ignores relegion in his work. However, he does hint at spirituality from time to time. In 'Outcast of Redwall', when Sunflash was wounded by the snakes he fought, he got a vision of seeing the gates of the 'Dark Forest' open, sort of like how people imagine there being a doorway to Heaven. Sunflash saw his long dead ancestors there, just as we imagine our own loved ones to be waiting for us when we die and go to the afterlife. Also, the vermin often talk of 'Hellgates', which is obviously their version of the afterlife, and they use it as a swearword, too. And in 'The Taggerung', Ermath the Seer talked about 'the Great Vulpuz, ruler of Hellgates'.

It all sounds like a sort of pagan mythology, with elements of other religions mixed in.

Lonna Bowstripe
March 12th, 2006, 10:45 AM
I just figured it out! They must be occult! Martin sold his soul to the devil in exchange for being able to come back and warn Redwallers! See? :rolleyes:

Barkstripe
March 12th, 2006, 03:06 PM
They don't have a religion. First of Bj said. Second-they don't mention God or any of that type of thing. The closest to that is Martin wich who is just a guardian. 3-If some of you go with saying that they are all monks and that type of thing than technically the Friars would be the leader.....4-No worshiping has ever been mentioned in the books.....

Chelki Sureshot
March 12th, 2006, 04:27 PM
No religion. At all. They don't worship anything. Sure, they've got a darkforest, because there got to be somewhere to send the vermin to, but that's it. And I like it that way.

RockJaw_Grang
March 13th, 2006, 09:09 AM
Good Beasts go to the Darkforest as well.
But as for as I know and am concerned there is no religion in the world of Redwall.


associated (did I spell that right?)
Almost.

Pawflash
March 14th, 2006, 01:16 AM
They don't have a religion. First of Bj said. Second-they don't mention God or any of that type of thing. The closest to that is Martin wich who is just a guardian. 3-If some of you go with saying that they are all monks and that type of thing than technically the Friars would be the leader.....4-No worshiping has ever been mentioned in the books.....

1) Alright, so he did. :p
2) You don't need a god to have a religion. Take Buddhism for an example.
3) Actually, if you live in an Abbey, then your leader would be an Abbot or Abbess, as is the case in the books.
4) Since when has worship been a requirement of religion? We all seem to have a very western idea of the term "religion." As much as I hate using dictionaries as evidence, only like one of four entries on the word includes "worship" at dictionary.com :p


Basically, I think it comes down to where one draws the line between religion and spiritualism.

Barkstripe
March 14th, 2006, 10:31 AM
1) Alright, so he did. :p
2) You don't need a god to have a religion. Take Buddhism for an example.
3) Actually, if you live in an Abbey, then your leader would be an Abbot or Abbess, as is the case in the books.
4) Since when has worship been a requirement of religion? We all seem to have a very western idea of the term "religion." As much as I hate using dictionaries as evidence, only like one of four entries on the word includes "worship" at dictionary.com :p


Basically, I think it comes down to where one draws the line between religion and spiritualism.
1)thanks
2)Good point. Buddhism makes everything a god/God right?....or is that the wrong religion....If i am correct than they do have a God.....wait...are the the religion that has like tons of Gods (whoever replys to this please don't turn it into a religious discussion.....it's actually a good topic)...
3)Actually. Friar's are also leaders of Abbeys. Take for example in the legend of zoro. The one guy is a Friar. He is also the leader of the church. I also talked to a teacher of Christian history from my church. He also said Friars were sometimes the leaders....although abbess's and abbot's sometimes were.....
4)Did i saw that all religions worship....no...I was just narrowing down wich religion they have if they have one.....



Oh...and the poll must offend catholics hey....technically catholics are christians....lol..

Renegade
March 14th, 2006, 12:33 PM
Good point. Buddhism makes everything a god/God right?....or is that the wrong religion....If i am correct than they do have a God.....wait...are the the religion that has like tons of Gods (whoever replys to this please don't turn it into a religious discussion.....it's actually a good topic)...

Americans. :p

Buddhism (at least here), holds the view that everybody is on the road to "nirvana", literally "extinction" and/or "extinguishing", is the culmination of the yogi's pursuit of liberation.
Got the definition from Wikipedia.

They don't worship anything per se, but see "Lord Buddha" as they put it as a sort of teacher, guiding them along the read to enlightenment/nirvana/whatever you wanna call it. However, they hold the belief that life is sacred, and depending on what school of thought they belong to, may abstain from meat/milk/eggs/beef/whatever else it is (it varies).

Hindusim has a large number of gods/deities. So does Taosim. The reason why Taoists don't eat beef is not because they worship cows, but because they believe it's cruel to kill the animal after all it does for you (this came from back when people farmed and bovine were used to plough the fields/drag carts/etc). Deities are kinda like "lesser" gods, sort of like patron saints. I have yet to hear of a religion where everything is a god.

Baby Rollo
March 14th, 2006, 04:47 PM
I think they're Jewish because they don't eat bacon.

Ferahgo the Assassin
March 14th, 2006, 05:09 PM
I think they're Jewish because they don't eat bacon.
I think they're Hindu because they don't eat cows, and they won't even drink their milk. They must really hold cows in high regard.

Hisk
March 14th, 2006, 10:04 PM
Cows not existing may have something to do with that...

Ferahgo the Assassin
March 14th, 2006, 10:15 PM
Cows not existing may have something to do with that...
Yes. My post was 100% sarcasm.

Qlberts
March 15th, 2006, 12:02 PM
I have yet to hear of a religion where everything is a god.
I believe that would be pantheism.


Pantheism (Greek: pan = all and Theos = God) literally means "God is All" and "All is God". It is the view that everything is of an all-encompassing immanent God; or that the universe, or nature, and God are equivalent. More detailed definitions tend to emphasize the idea that natural law, existence, and/or the universe (the sum total of all that is, was, and shall be) is represented or personified in the theological principle of 'God'.