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redwallfan91
August 18th, 2010, 11:56 PM
Bland, bland title, I know. Apology offered with great sincerity.

The summer plans thread still has a few coals left burning, but as I look around me I realise that school is already beginning to start up, and summer's end is just around the corner.

So here's the question:

How do you feel about college? (I realise that those members not going to college yet will be left out...feel free to discuss your feelings about high school in your own thread ;) )

Are you excited to be leaving, sad to be away from home? Anybody a first year? If you're a second year, are you more excited now than you were?

For those who aren't in college anymore but remember what it was like, any nostalgia left over from days of yore?

I'm not actually going to college this year. Financially it was impossible, and so I've put it off a year. But I'm pining away for it already, to be honest. It's going to be a long 14 months.

LordTBT
August 19th, 2010, 12:35 AM
Nostalgia? Nostalgia for sitting in a classroom reading what I probably don't want to read and writing about what I probably don't want to write about?

No thanks. Quite happy doing what I want to do, and receiving a paycheck for it.

Good luck with the year off, most find it very difficult to return to the world of homework after putting that to a halt.

Find out about this year's incoming freshman class! :rolleyes:
http://www.cnn.com/2010/LIVING/08/18/college.mindset.list/?hpt=T2

Ferahgo the Assassin
August 19th, 2010, 01:02 AM
I too am quite glad to be done with university. Looking back, there's not a whole lot I genuinely miss about it, and I'm much happier where I am today.

Renegade
August 19th, 2010, 09:56 AM
I miss my hostel room, and still hold to the statement that when I was in college, I ate better, slept better and my clothes were cleaner. Hostel living aside, I'm glad i'm outta there.

Sagrived Switpaw
August 20th, 2010, 12:31 AM
Third year at university. Ready to return and have a purpose other than a very small paycheck which I have no current need for. My school is a good distance from my house, so it will nice to see all the old faces and greet the new ones.

I also play college baseball which means that my arm is usually rather idle over the summer. My theory is that when you lose your group of committed teammates, its rather hard to stay committed. :p

Bladeswift
August 20th, 2010, 02:23 AM
I only attended a semester or two at my local uni. Just about all my courses were introductory level, so I could pass them all without ever studying. And Since it was cheaper to just drive there I never got to experience dorm life.

From what little I did experience of the bohemian college life, it was better than high school but not much else. I think a lot of it depends on the school and the professors, though.

As far as dorm living goes I guess living in Army barracks is similar. You definitely have to cope with homesickness and not killing your roommate(s).

Edit: Oh, and the Army is really just one huge frat house.

Ember Nickel
August 23rd, 2010, 09:56 AM
Second year. Less excited than I was last time, overall, yet strangely find myself looking forward to it at odd intervals. Won't be particularly sad to be away from home (nothing wrong with my home, mind you, just don't mind leaving), but there were a lot of low points last year and, if this is set to be an encore, I can't say I'm anticipating it. Lots of high points last year too, mind you.

Fuzface
August 25th, 2010, 02:32 PM
I'm not leaving home. I'm at a community college. I like it well enough, but books are far more expensive than they should be.

The dirgecallers
August 25th, 2010, 04:13 PM
I am currently in community college in my second year. I pretty much am plowing through my transfer list of general ed courses before a 4 year. I'm finding it easier having already completed two quarters. Some classes I think I'm going to like more than others. Yes, books are expensive, and I think its a real pain.

Also, I'm beginning to notice some 'popular fiction' on the mandatory booklist for some english classes. Not criticizing that choice but I think its interesting that bestsellers of the past 10 years are being analyzed and discussed as to their literary value in a scholarly environment.

LordTBT
August 25th, 2010, 06:24 PM
Tip: Only purchase your books used online from independent e-tailers. You'll save hundreds. Amazon is great for this.

Since you'll save so much shopping online, you might even find yourself making a profit selling back to the school. ;)

Mackinsie
August 26th, 2010, 03:40 PM
You will save if you go through online sites like Amazon or Half, but it is still ridiculous how much you have to spend for each class. It only gets worse the higher you go up the education ladder. You don't want to know how much I have had to pay! :rolleyes:

Also, try ILL if there is a book you need for just one assignment/report and you don't want to actually buy it.

Also, for those of you with a .edu email address, sign up for Amazon Student (http://www.amazon.com/gp/student/signup/info) and you get an Amazon Prime membership (free 2 day shipping!) for free. :D

Ferahgo the Assassin
August 26th, 2010, 08:57 PM
Yeah, fully agreed with the "textbooks are criminally expensive" camp. Don't give your school the satisfaction of having you spend hundreds of dollars on new books in their campus bookstore just because it's easier. I've saved lots of money using Amazon and eBay for textbooks (plus, where else can you find a textbook that has extremely amusing drawings in it? One of my physics textbooks had a very inappropriate flipbook "animation" in the page corners that gave me quite a laugh).

I was also surprised at how many classes did not even really use the textbook all that much. I'd say that at least half of my science/math classes would have been easily passable without the textbook at all. Unfortunately, it's always impossible to know which classes you'll need it for and which ones you won't before the semester starts. :rolleyes:

Lyrian Aryns
October 1st, 2010, 02:35 PM
Graduated, got a job, done with that whole school thing for a while. May go back for a Master's at some point. Later. I've been rediscovering how nice it it to spend all day Sunday reading a novel instead of spending all my time trying to get projects done.

I always bought my books used on Amazon a couple of weeks before the new semester started (before most people went book-buying, so the prices tended to be lower), then sold them to somebody else at the beginning of the next semester (when people were scrambling to get books, so you could get away with charging more). Even given Amazon's commission for selling the book, I usually came close to breaking even. (Argh, that's sad, now that I think about it). I had a friend that got all his textbooks on interlibrary loan... when he couldn't renew them anymore, he just requested new copies.

Everyone always tells you that you'll regret selling your college textbooks, but in comp sci at least, anything you need from a textbook you can also find online...not to mention that textbooks become obsolete scary-fast. I remember one of my books (published in the last year) has an article about new graphics cards and spotlighting the 8800gt, which isn't even MADE anymore.

Hisk
December 5th, 2010, 01:27 AM
Uuurghhh don't talk to me about university right now!

I'm currently into the grad-school masters application scramble and it's a mess, got a gajillion bajillion thinks to worry about (sending in apps, getting prof references, not getting awful marks, finishing end-of-term essays, studying for exams) all at exactly the same time. I am dealing with this by a mix of alcoholic beverages, energy drinks, swearing, praying, and running in circles waving my hands screaming.


I was also surprised at how many classes did not even really use the textbook all that much.
Yup. found the same thing. In fact in the last two years of undergrad I've gotten through classes without even buying the textbooks- I only get them once I'm assigned something that uses them. Until then I don't bother due to the frequency of unused textbook money sinkholes.

The dirgecallers
July 24th, 2011, 03:26 PM
A little late, but i did get accepted into a four year university just a week ago! Sorry for bumping an old topic, but I really did not want to create a new thread. Anyways, I have to do community college another semester because I don't start USC until spring.

Still trying to decide whether I should keep my major of international Relations/global business... or go on the adventurous side and major in Archeology.

Wish me luck!:D

Mackinsie
July 24th, 2011, 05:25 PM
A little late, but i did get accepted into a four year university just a week ago! Sorry for bumping an old topic, but I really did not want to create a new thread. Anyways, I have to do community college another semester because I don't start USC until spring.
Congratulations! :)


Still trying to decide whether I should keep my major of international Relations/global business... or go on the adventurous side and major in Archeology.
One thing for you to consider is the employment potential of a degree and whether you need additional years in school for either a master's degree or a doctorate. Archeology Careers (http://archaeology.about.com/od/questionoftheweek/qt/career_query.htm)


Wish me luck!:D
Good luck!