Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 34

Thread: Classical Music

  1. #1
    Patroller Lonna Bowstripe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    US
    Posts
    1,888

    Classical Music

    How many of you like classical music? What are your favorite composers? Your favorite compositions? Etc.


    As most of you already know, my favorite composer is Rachmaninov. His rich, lush, big, music is always beautiful, but he can throw in the fiery Beethoven, too. His 2nd piano concerto is big at first, then resolves into that legato melody. Rhapsody on a Theme by Paganini is probably my favorite classical compositon ever, especially the 18th variation. I also enjoy his choral The Angel, where when the choir moves on to the next theme, the piano echoes the previous theme.

    Rachmaninov is followed a close second by Debussy. His music, like Rachmaninov's, is lush, but not big. Debussy will also throw in the occasinal syncopation, such as in Golliwogg's Cakewalk from Children's Corner. My favorite piece by him will have to be Images I: Reflects Dans L'Eau.

    And Beethoven, you can't forget him! Beethoven is a great composer. While not as rich as Rachmaninov and Debussy, that can be expected because he lived over half a century earlier. Beethoven is firey, probably because had a bad childhood and became deaf. It always amazes me how he could compose while he was deaf! It's a miracle! I do believe he could feel the vibrations, though. His ninth symphony is, well, probably the greatest piece ever written, partly because of its feeling and, well, it's very musical! and partly because Beethoven was deaf when he wrote it. As I like to say: "Beethoven 'patented the clash.'"

    I also enjoy Classical and Barouqe: Mozart, Bach, Handel, etc, but not as much. I guess I prefer the rich melodies of the Romantic over polyphony of the Barouqe. The Reninassance can be nice too; all the parts independant.
    -LB

  2. #2
    Patroller Hisk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    1,663
    I'm not big on WAM, but I'll occasionally catch myself listening either to Holst or Katchaturian (whose name I can't spell). IE...like three time per year.

  3. #3
    Patroller: Emeritus Cale Yin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    in my apartment.
    Posts
    1,084
    Is this the 3rd music topic? anyway, I would like to have recommendations. What should I listen to while I'm doing homework (there are 2 kinds of homework for me: art homework, and the dreaded left-brained papers and readings and other ugly things)? Things that will encourage my concentration and not demand my attention? Did I already ask this?

    I am thinking it's a sign that the freckles
    In our eyes are mirror images and when
    We kiss they're perfectly aligned
    And I have to speculate that God himself
    Did make us into corresponding shapes like
    Puzzle pieces from the clay...

    They will see us waving from such great
    Heights, 'come down now,' they'll say
    But everything looks perfect from far away,
    'Come down now...' but we'll stay...
    -Postal Service, Give Up

  4. #4
    Patroller PiarasJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    1,273
    I dont know anything about classical music, but lately I've been listening to ABC Classic FM on the radio, as a protest against all the Hiphop they keep playing on Triple J. :P

    I've decided I like classical guitar, and I think this one dude does some fantastic things with didgeridoos, I don't know why it wasn't done sooner. Or maybe it was and I just wasn't listening.

    Mum likes Chopin, so we have a couple of CD's that I listen to sometimes when I'm studying or drawing and I can't decide whether it would help my concentration more to listen to music, or have silence. The lack of lyrics is good for concentration, plus I think it's good to have GOOD music playing in the background when you're being creative because then it flows into your work.

    edit: funnily enough, I'm drawing right now (or I was, but I'm having a break to eat some chocolate slice that my sister made), and I'm listening to Bob Dylan. I don't think you could possibly consider his music technically GOOD, but it's still brilliant. There's nothing like listening to the words "EVERYBODY MUST GET STONED" when you're trying to be serious.
    Last edited by PiarasJ; May 12th, 2005 at 09:15 PM.
    ~p

    In the middle ground between futile revolution and blind materialism is the direct experience.

  5. #5
    Patroller: General Josiah the Warrior's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    In a Hokie Nation
    Posts
    3,012
    I like it, but I'm not really into it. I just listen to the big name composers, my favorites are Bach, Ludwig Van and Mozart. Oh man in chorus we did this Mozart piece (Coronation Mass aka 'Kyrie', pronounced 'Key-ree-eh') it was incredible! We have an awesome teacher and we used a professional orchestra, we preformed it in a church of course and it was just incredible. I bought the CD and although I'm not one for self-praise, no one could've done it better than we did, at first I thought they gave us the wrong CD it was so good. Even my loser friends who only listen to their stupid ska and 'PR' had to admit it was brilliant.. A night I'll never forget.
    -Josiah the Warrior

    "Life's a game; fight for survival and see if you're worth it."
    -Battle Royale

  6. #6
    Patroller Hisk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    1,663
    I would like to have recommendations. What should I listen to while I'm doing homework
    Not what I mentioned! LOL! You've probebly heard Katchie's "saber dance" on a commercial TV show or whatnot, it's pretty familiar. NOT something you try and listen to and concentrate at the same time!

  7. #7
    Patroller PiarasJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    1,273
    That is so weird. Caleyin posted her question while I was typing, and my post answered her question.

    Spooky.
    ~p

    In the middle ground between futile revolution and blind materialism is the direct experience.

  8. #8
    Patroller Lord Servone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Walt Disney Must Feed!
    Posts
    735
    I like classical music, though its mainly in the form of movie scores (John Williams, Hans Zimmer, Howard Shore, and more).

    Some classical songs I like are Farandole (Bizet), O Fortuna (Orff), Piano Concerto in A Minor (Grieg), The Planets: Mars, The Planets: Jupiter (Holst), Piano Conrcert #1 (Tchaiskovsky) Adiago for Strings (Barber), Funeral March (Chopin), and March to the Scaffold (Berlioz). Those are some recommendations I....recommend.

    I find classical music as good background sound, as when I'm writing or reading. I like the lack of lyrics (or lyrics that are in another language)...as somebody else said, its easier to concentrate with it. I wrote some pretty good scenes when listening to the right sounding song.

  9. #9
    Patroller: Emeritus Cale Yin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    in my apartment.
    Posts
    1,084
    My parents went to Arizona (Southwestern state characterized by desert and red rocks and art community) a while ago and they saw a guy performing on the road, and he was doing Spanish guitar, and they bought his CD. It's pretty good. What is 'didgeridoo'? and how do you say it?

    I am thinking it's a sign that the freckles
    In our eyes are mirror images and when
    We kiss they're perfectly aligned
    And I have to speculate that God himself
    Did make us into corresponding shapes like
    Puzzle pieces from the clay...

    They will see us waving from such great
    Heights, 'come down now,' they'll say
    But everything looks perfect from far away,
    'Come down now...' but we'll stay...
    -Postal Service, Give Up

  10. #10
    Patroller: General Josiah the Warrior's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    In a Hokie Nation
    Posts
    3,012
    Quote Originally Posted by Cale Yin
    What is 'didgeridoo'? and how do you say it?
    A digeridoo is an instrument native to native Australians (help me out with detail Piares! ). It's pronounced "dih-jer-ree-doo", mate.
    -Josiah the Warrior

    "Life's a game; fight for survival and see if you're worth it."
    -Battle Royale

  11. #11
    Patroller PiarasJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    1,273
    heh, yep Josiah's spot on. It's thousands of years old, made from a thick eucalyptus limb that has been hollowed out by termites. You blow in one end and the vibrations make a really distinctive sort of music, there are some pretty clever didj players around, such as Xavier Rudd

    To play it properly you have to learn to blow air out of your cheeks while simultaneously replacing it with air from your lungs so that the sound is constant rather than stop-start-stop as you take breaths. It's pretty tricky (for me at least, I couldn't do it when I tried).

    Xavier's music is great for creative work and concentrating. It's really mellow.
    ~p

    In the middle ground between futile revolution and blind materialism is the direct experience.

  12. #12
    Patroller: General Ferahgo the Assassin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    2,845
    I love classical music. As unoriginal as I may be, I think that Beethoven is probably my favorite composer. In my opinion, his best piece (and my favorite, naturally) is his Symphony No. 6 (Pastoral) Op. 68: I Allegro Ma Non Troppo. I first heard it as a rather small child in the original Fantasia movie, and was blown away. It's a beautiful piece, if not one of Beethoven's more popular ones.
    Quote Originally Posted by PiarasJ
    ...and I'm listening to Bob Dylan. I don't think you could possibly consider his music technically GOOD, but it's still brilliant.
    I consider Bob Dylan good! He's definitely one of the best lyricists of all time, and he can really tear up that harmonica. Not the best voice in the world, of course... but everyone has their faults.
    "Luck, good or bad, is not the hand of God. Luck is the way the wind swirls and dust settles eons after God has passed by." - Winston Niles Rumsfoord, The Sirens of Titan

  13. #13
    Patroller Lord Servone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Walt Disney Must Feed!
    Posts
    735
    I saw Dylan in concert a couple of years ago and it was great. He is probably one of the best songwriters alive, though not necessarily the best singer...

  14. #14
    Charter Member Treerose's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Oklahoma
    Posts
    547
    A classical music topic not started by me!

    Nothing unoriginal about liking Beethoven, Feragho…there’s a very good reason why he’s so popular, and that’s because his music is so great. He’s one of my favorites, too.

    I love giving classical music recommendations, so Caleyin, I’m going to go ahead and give you and any others who might be interested a big list. (Operative word being big. <g>)

    Before I get to that, I just wanted to point out that if you don’t know anything about classical music, or want to learn more about other classical styles besides Beethoven and Mozart, the other arts, especially the visual arts, are a huge help. Especially in this last century, what happened in painting had its parallel in music. When we had Impressionist painters, we had Ravel and Debussy in music, when we had Expressionist painters, we had Schoenberg, who was also an Expressionist painter himself. Cubism – we have Schoenberg again, and even Igor Stravinsky was influenced by Picasso. Surrealism…Edgar Varese and Bohuslav Martinu. And so on. Not only in painting, but in writing and architecture, too…the arts are all so related to one another. So basically, if you like a certain style in one art, you can find its parallel in the other arts.

    Igor Stravinsky:

    The Firebird Suite: Whole thing is spectacular, but the best parts are the “Ronde des princesses,” “Infernal Dance of King Kashchei”, and the final movement, “Berceuse.”

    Petrouchka About a puppet named Petrouchka in love with another puppet, who’s a ballerina. Originally a ballet, so the connection between the plot and the music is obviously very important. Poor Petrouchka… that’s all I’ll say.

    Rite of Spring: Everyone probably knows this from the latest Disney “Fantasia”, but if you want to hear a piece that caused a riot at its premiere, try this. This is not like Firebird or Petrouchka… this is amazing, weird, terrifying (literally! the entrance of the Sage is some of the most chilling music you’ll ever hear), loud, dissonant, and not something to play for background music for dinner. This music seizes you by the throat and makes you listen.

    Gustav Holst:

    The Planets: “Jupiter” and “Mars”, but especially “Jupiter.” This has a marvellous, grandiose melody (later used in the hymn “I Vow To Thee My Country”).

    Giuseppe Verdi:

    Requiem: Definitely the showiest movement is the “Dies Irae / Tuba Mirum.” (Josiah, if you liked the Mozart Mass, you might like this, too. ) The “Tuba Mirum” section has the most spectacular multiple-trumpet-scoring in music history, including one which is off stage and answers the onstage trumpets.

    Leonard Bernstein:

    Candide Overture: A great piece, with a beautiful middle section. Best recording of this is the one of Bernstein himself with the New York Philharmonic. If you like this, also try his West Side Story, too.

    Aaron Copland:

    A Lincoln Portrait: Includes a narration of quotes of and about Lincoln. That means there is only one recording of this to get: James Earl Jones (with the Seattle Symphony). No one can beat him! This piece (with JEJ!) is a supreme example of how perfectly text and music can go together.

    Billy the Kid: A great, thoroughly American West piece, complete with a gunfight courtesy of the percussion section.

    George Gershwin:

    Rhapsody in Blue This is very famous, of course, but it’s great to hear this with Gershwin himself at the piano. If you like Gershwin, you might want to try An American in Paris, too.

    Nicolai Rimsky-Korsakov:

    Scheherazade: Based on the tale of Scheherazade. The solo violin cadenzas represent her voice, and each movement tells a different story (like Sinbad the Sailor). Brilliant and beautiful by turns, this is one of my favorite pieces.

    Russian Easter Overture: Very beautiful, gorgeous orchestration.

    Sergei Prokofiev:

    There’s lots of famous Prokofiev…. For the Love of Three Oranges, Lieutenant Kije, Romeo and Juliet, and Peter & the Wolf.

    Peter is a narrated story about a boy vs a wolf, but it’s not just for little kids. Kije is a suite from a film score of Proke’s.

    Erik Satie:

    Gymnopedies. There’s a few of these, originally scored for piano, but Number 1 is the most famous. Satie was a jokester composer (“Before composing a work, I go round it several times accompanied by myself”), but despite his scoffing at serious music, this is just pure, simple, peaceful, beautiful music.

    Gabriel Faure: Pavane: A short yet truly beautiful gem of orchestral music.

    Requiem: Another Faure gem… it’s shorter and much happier than requiems usually are. The “Agnus Dei” is so sunny and peaceful….

    Ralph Vaughan Williams:

    Fantasia on a Theme of Thomas Tallis, The Wasp Overture, Five Variants of ‘Dives & Lazarus’, The Lark Ascending for violin and orchestra, English Folk Songs Suite…. Basically, anything of his is great! <g>

    Peter I. Tchaikovsky:

    Symphony #4: Russian Romantic composer. The most famous of Tchaik’s symphonies, this is seriously anguished music at times, and more upbeat at others.

    Symphony #1 – “Winter Daydreams” This is actually a cheery Tchaik symphony! Very pretty, gorgeous slow movement, and overall sounds just like a scene from a snowy countryside, complete with one-horse sleigh and sleighbells.

    1812 Overture - I just have to mention this in case you like hearing artillery in music. As Calvin (of Calvin & Hobbes) once said, “They play this in crowded concert halls? Gee, I thought classical music was boring!” (Actually, the only times I’ve heard this were in outdoor performances… I suppose bringing in cannons do limit the choice of performance venues somewhat. )

    Hector Berlioz:

    Symphony Fantastique: Written probably while Berlioz was on drugs, and it sounds like it. (A wild and weird man, anyway.) The “March to the Scaffold” movement is the most famous, and let’s just say that the music is, um, very descriptive, at the end…

    Ludwig van Beethoven:

    Symphonies 3, 5, 6, 7, 9: in particular are really great, but all Beethoven symphonies are good. . Along with the 5th, the “Pastoral” or 6th symphony are probably his most popular, but my favorite’s probably the 7th.

    Maurice Ravel:

    Daphnis & Chloe: There’s sheer magic in this, in the way it’s orchestrated, and in the melodies used…. There were pirates in the original ballet. Pirates! Who doesn’t like pirates? (Okay, we don’t have to answer that. <g>)

    Antonin Dvorak:

    Symphony #8 (or G Major): Czech composer Dvorak was very prolific in terms of wonderfully singable melodies, and this is just crammed with them.

    Jean Sibelius:

    Finlandia: Written when Finland was under Russian oppression, this piece became the anthem for the Finns in their fight for freedom. The slow melody from this has been turned into a hymn, too: “Be Still My Soul.”

    Symphony #5 - Sibelius’ symphonies are really underrated. I love the final movement of this piece… it reminds me of the music used in the movie Spirited Away, for some reason…

    Bela Bartok:

    Romanian Dances - Bartok was very interested in the folksongs of his native land, as this suite shows… if you want to try other Bartok, his Concerto for Orchestra is good, too. This is a very different style from Beethoven and the Romantic era, though, so consider yourself warned.

    Paul Hindemith:

    Symphonic Metamorphoses is a cool, 20th century piece. There’s dissonance, as there is in much of 20th century music, but dissonance in a good way.

    Morton Gould:

    American Salute: A great, short piece by an American composer based on “When Johnny Comes Marching Home.”

    Dmitri Shostakovich:

    Putting Shosti on this list is questionable… this is not light music... The 13th symphony, Babi Yar is tragic, heavy, yet beautiful music, though, based on the horrors that took place at Babi Yar during World War II. Hearing the composer himself read the poems “Babi Yar” and “The Loss” and the NY Philharmonic playing the symphony is really a unique musical experience.

    Renaissance/Medieval music:

    An often unexplored era…. very pure music, uncomplicated music which is often refreshing to listen to today. Best composers of the Renaissance are Guillaume Dufay, John Dunstable, Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina, Josquin des Prez, John Dowland, Guillaume Machaut, and Roland de Lassus.

    Medieval music… Hildegarde von Bingen is not only one of the earliest composers for which we have a name, but she was a woman, too. Leonin and Perotin also wrote some of the earliest forays outside of the usual Gregorian chant.

    I’ve tried to cover as many styles as I can, because classical music is so broad, there’s something for everyone to like. (I didn’t even get to the anti-consonant music, but maybe some here would like that, though… )

    Tree

    ~~~~~

    “Mr. Prokofiev might well have loaded up a shotgun with several thousand notes and discharged them against the side of blank wall."

    ~A disgruntled critic’s review of Prokofiev’s “For the Love of Three Oranges”~

  15. #15
    Patroller Lonna Bowstripe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    US
    Posts
    1,888
    Quote Originally Posted by Tree
    Leonard Bernstein:
    Bernstein... You have to admire his Chichester Psalms. The flowing music matches the flowing words.
    Gabriel Faure:
    Requiem: Another Faure gem… it’s shorter and much happier than requiems usually are. The “Agnus Dei” is so sunny and peaceful….
    Personally, I prefer the 6th movement. (Can't remember the name.) Lord of the Rings reminds me of it. I think Howard Shore copied…
    Best composers of the Renaissance are Guillaume Dufay, John Dunstable, Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina, Josquin des Prez, John Dowland, Guillaume Machaut, and Roland de Lassus.
    You forgot Tomás Luis de Victoria. His O Vos Omnes really is a beautiful piece of music.

    And you forgot Kabalefsky on that list…
    -LB

Similar Threads

  1. Yet another music post from Tree...
    By Treerose in forum The Patroller - General Discussion
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: July 9th, 2004, 06:51 PM
  2. Music Recommendations (Mainly classical)
    By Lord Servone in forum The Patroller - General Discussion
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: July 23rd, 2003, 10:46 PM
  3. Music Labels Threaten to Sue Net Users
    By Glenner in forum The Patroller - General Discussion
    Replies: 32
    Last Post: July 9th, 2003, 06:18 PM
  4. Writing/Reading Music?
    By Lord Servone in forum The Patroller - General Discussion
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: March 23rd, 2003, 02:49 PM
  5. Music!
    By Treerose in forum The Patroller - General Discussion
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: November 6th, 2002, 10:15 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •